filmmaking

Greenhouse Studios Explores the Space of Collaboration

Greenhouse Studios has always been concerned with fostering meaningful work using digital tools as a medium. However, the members of Greenhouse Studios, and the Digital Humanities movement as a whole, often rely on physical space to cultivate collaboration as well. While Greenhouse Studios has always used virtual spaces such as Google Docs and Slack in our design process, having a physical space filled with whiteboards, screens, notepads, and other tools has been integral to the process of collaboration. Since the beginning of COVID-19 and the practice of social distancing, Greenhouse Studios has been searching for creative solutions to try to replicate the physical space of the design process. These efforts are exemplified in a recent 2 week fully virtual collaboration by the team.

The team took up the project with the prompt “Social Distance” and condensed the design process to fit a 2 week timeline. Throughout the early, discussion-heavy phases of the project, the team used WebEx, Mural, and Google Docs to replicate synchronous, conversation-based brainstorming. As the project progressed, the team also communicated through Slack and Mural asynchronously. The team even experimented with using the app House Party to try to simulate the random encounters in physical workspaces. All of these tools were used to help create a sense of a common “place” where everyone in the project could meet and share ideas.

Overall, the project was successful, and the team learned a lot about planning and managing online collaboration efforts. The result was a video that explores why people are driven, both voluntarily and involuntarily, to isolate through history and the present moment.

 


Garrett McComas

Fellow, Greenhouse Studios

Alom from the Fino Project Runs 16-mm Film Workshop with Students

16-mm Film Screening Juan Carlos Alom

The Workshop

On the evening of November 9th, I gathered in the Ballard Institute of Puppetry theater to watch four short films produced by students with old-fashioned 16-mm cameras. The films were made in a workshop conducted by Cuban artist Juan Carlos Alom, a filmmaker and photographer whose work has been exhibited throughout the world, and Aimara Fernádez. Alom is a team member of our Fino and Global Cuban Cultures collaboration, which is in the build phase of project development. The event was sponsored by the University of Connecticut: School of Fine Arts; Robert H. Gray Memorial Lecture; Greenhouse Studios; Literatures, Cultures & Languages; El Instituto: Plank Lecture Series; Humanities Institute; Global Affairs; Dodd Center; Human Rights Institute; Connecting with the Arts; and Center for the Study of Popular Music.

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