design thinking

Creativity and the Scholarly Record

 

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“There is no scholarship without preservation.”

At Greenhouse Studios, we are working out the process of creating new forms of scholarship. One important aspect of what differentiates scholarship from projects is sustainability. As I like to say, there is no scholarship without persistence. The infrastructure of persistence is well understood in traditional academic publishing, but is less understood in the world digital humanities.

The Greenhouse Studios model works through five distinct phases, Understand, Identify, Build, Review, Release, and is based on the idea of flattening traditional academic hierarchies: we do not build things for faculty, we gather together a group of people around a common intellectual question, and go from there.

Archivists have traditionally insisted that it improves the preservation potential of any digital record for the archivist—or at least preservation thinking—to be a part of the creation of that record from the beginning. At Greenhouse Studios we are testing what that actually means in terms of new forms of scholarship. What is the beginning? When is it appropriate to consider preservation? Continue reading

The Understand Phase Explained

When people ask me about what we do at Greenhouse Studios, it is challenging to distill all of its ambitions into a easily digestible tidbit. Ultimately, we are attempting to change the way scholarship is produced. As a result, many of Greenhouse Studios’ features are responsive to the limitations of mainstream academic practice. In this post, I thought I would share an in-depth explanation of the Understand phase, the first phase stage of collaboration in the Greenhouse Studios design process. I will describe our current process with a degree of generality, as we are constantly evaluating its efficacy and suggesting possible tweaks. I’ll explain how this first phase sets the stage for our teams to generate innovative forms of scholarship.

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Design Thinking Workshop

 

On Tuesday, October 24th, 28 participants consisting of faculty, librarians, and Greenhouse Studios collaborators engaged in a Design Thinking Workshop at Greenhouse Studios. Led by Tom Scheinfeldt, Clarissa Ceglio, and Sara Sikes, the workshop explored the “understand” phase of the Greenhouse Studios design process model.   Continue reading

Fully-funded Greenhouse Studios Graduate Studentships

Greenhouse Studios, in partnership with the University of Connecticut School of Fine Arts, is pleased to announce two funded M.F.A. studentships in either Digital Media & Design or Studio Art. The studentships will provide full tuition, health benefits, and a half-time graduate research assistantship with Greenhouse Studios | Scholarly Communications Design at UConn. Greenhouse Studios Graduate Assistants provide artistic, design, creative expression, and technical implementation assistance to Greenhouse Studios projects. Working in a dynamic, team environment alongside faculty, library, editor, and student colleagues, graduate assistants contribute to the production of collaborative multimedia research objects. Other responsibilities include supporting day-to-day operations of the Greenhouse Studios, its directors, and its collaborative workspace. This is an exciting opportunity for an aspiring artist or scholar to work in close collaboration with experts from a range of fields and to experiment with new modes of expression and communication.

For more information, please email greenhousestudios@uconn.edu with subject line "Graduate Studentship".

Graduate Studentships

Spotlight: Brooke Foti Gemmell

Brooke Foti Gemmell is a Design Technologist at Greenhouse Studios who joined us from the Archives and Special Collections at the University of Connecticut. She is an enthusiastic and passionate member of the team. Brooke recently answered some questions related to her role at Greenhouse Studios.


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A Greenhouse Takes Root in the Library

Greetings and welcome to the Greenhouse Studios blog! We are currently settling into the newly renovated 1st floor of UConn’s Homer D. Babbidge Library, and we are thrilled to be in our new space. The glass walls echo the setting of an actual greenhouse, and the brightly lit room inspires our ideation, creativity, and collaborative processes. Many thanks to the University and our Library colleagues for this purpose-built research space and the ongoing support of our work. Setting up the space has been a continuous team effort. After iterating furniture layouts, relocating from our startup space on the 3rd floor, and configuring our project rooms, the Greenhouse Studios is nearly complete. Graduate Research Assistant River Soma, an MFA candidate at the School of Fine Arts (SFA), is leading the effort to make the space a source of visual inspiration. She is currently painting a floor-to-ceiling mural across a section of glass wall to showcase the design process model we’re applying to the production of scholarly research and communications. We’re documenting River’s process and look forward to unveiling the final result!

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Greenhouse Studios’ First Projects Grapple with The Limits of Text

Greenhouse Studios, a new research unit at the University of Connecticut, is beginning implementation of a collaboration-first approach for the creation and communication of scholarship thanks to a $789,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This award is theGreenhouse Studios Logo first of its kind at UConn and part of the Mellon Foundation’s Scholarly Communications program, a multi-pronged effort to accelerate the evolution of scholarly practice and academic publishing to meet the opportunities and challenges of the digital age. Greenhouse Studios is a joint effort of the University Library, School of Fine Arts, and the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, with each contributing resources and personnel to advance scholarly communications research. “Greenhouse Studios represents the kind of bold commitment to interdisciplinary research that our academic plan identified as central to solving the problems of the 21st century and to cementing UConn’s place as a driver of innovation and excellence within the State of Connecticut and around the world,” says Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Jeremy Teitelbaum.

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